ISC-Audubon

 
 
 

Broadcast Audubon

State of the Birds 2013

The fourth State of the Birds report highlights the enormous contributions private landowners make to bird and habitat conservation, and state-of-the-birds-report-coveropportunities for increased contributions. Roughly 60% of the land area in the United States (1.43 billion acres) is privately owned by millions of individuals, families, organizations, and corporations, including 2 million ranchers and farmers and about 10 million woodland owners. More than 100 species have 50% or more of their U.S. breeding distributions on private lands.

Birds are important indicators of the health of our environment. To assess bird populations and conservation opportunities on private lands across the nation, the State of the Birds report combined the latest eBird distribution data with land ownership data from the Protected Areas Database of the U.S. As in past reports, the report focused on species dependent on a single primary habitat, or habitat obligates.

The results emphasize the high dependence on private lands among grassland, wetland, and eastern forest birds, with important conservation opportunities existing in all habitats. Many conservation programs available to private landowners offer win-win opportunities to implement land management practices that benefit birds and landowners. The success stories highlighted in the report demonstrate that voluntary private landowner efforts can yield real and meaningful bird conservation results.

Working cooperatively with private landowners is a central theme of ISC-Audubon. That is why ISC-Audubon has created the John James Audubon Conservation Network and the Audubon Bird and Wildlife Sanctuary Program for landowners. ISC-Audubon is looking to greatly expand its network of certified bird sanctuaries over the next year.

SustainAbility Newsletter Archive Article (random)

Saving Resources

Reuse

Most of the materials that go into making what we use -- from airplanes to toilet paper -- are made from nonrenewable resources that are being rapidly depleted. U.S. reserves of oil, aluminum ore, and iron ore are disappearing. At today's rates of consumption, world copper reserves will be depleted in less than 100 years.

What you can do
Recycle materials you use- Recycling saves resources, decreases the use of toxic chemicals, cuts energy use, helps curb global warming, stems the flow of water and air pollution, and reduces the need for landfills and incinerators. Make an effort to participate fully in your town's or your building's recycling program. If there's no recycling program where you live, encourage local officials to start one. If you have a recycling program where you live, work to expand it. In the meantime, learn where you can take items such as paper, cardboard, glass, aluminum, plastic, and tires to be recycled, then take your recycling there.

Buy recycled products- Look on the label for the products or packaging with the greatest percentage of post-consumer recycled content, which ensures that a percentage of materials have been used before. Try to buy paper products that have more than 50 percent post-consumer content.

Compost- Composting reduces the burden on overflowing landfills and gives you a great natural fertilizer for plants and gardens. Buy a composting kit at a garden supply or hardware store. Start with yard trimmings, fruit and vegetable food scraps, and coffee grounds.

Buy products with less packaging- A large percentage of the paper, cardboard, and plastic we use goes into packaging -- much of it wasteful and unnecessary. When you buy a product, look at the packaging and ask: Can it be reused? Is it made of post-consumer recycled materials? Is it necessary at all? Reward those companies that are most enlightened about their use of packaging by purchasing their products. Contact companies that overpackage and tell them you will be more likely to buy if they eliminate unnecessary packaging.

Use durable goods- Bring your own cloth bags to local stores. Replace plastic and paper cups with ceramic mugs, disposable razors with reusable ones. Refuse unneeded plastic utensils, napkins, and straws when you buy takeout foods. Use a cloth dishrag instead of paper towels at home, and reusable food containers instead of aluminum foil and plastic wrap.


Fast Facts

  • Each person throws away on average four pounds of garbage every day.
  • The energy we save when we recycle one glass bottle is enough to light a traditional light bulb for four hours.
  • One gallon of motor oil can contaminate up to 2 million gallons of water, so please dispose of used oil properly!

PDF

 
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE ENTIRE NEWSLETTER IN PDF FORMAT

References and Sources used in this issue of SustainAbility Newsletter Include:

Audubon Lifestyles
www.audubonlifestyles.com

The International Sustainability Council
www.thesustainabilitycouncil.org

Home Yard Waste Compost Guide
http://www.compostguide.com/

The US Environmental Protection Agency
www.epa.gov/compost

Landscape Lighting
A Consumer Guide to Low Voltage Outdoor Lighting
http://www.sitelights.com/

Solar Light Store
http://www.solarlightstore.com/

Saving Natural Resources
Natural Resources Defense Council
www.nrdc.org

Organic Farming
Organic Farming Research Foundation
www.ofrf.org

National Agricultural Library
www.nal.usda.gov

Local Government & the Environment
Project Vote Smart
www.votesmart.org

Audubon Today
Audubon International
www.auduboninternational.org

    

$25 Annually $100 Annually $250 Reg / $100 Annually


SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITY

Sponsors are a critically important part to the success of ISC-Audubon. As a non-profit organization dedicated to advocating sustainability, we offer all of our programs to our members free of charge, and are publicly available for download on our website.

ISC-Audubon is proud to extend the opportunity to select businesses and organizations to become sponsors of our sustainability education and advocacy programs. As a sponsor, your business or organization can realize significant value.

Click here to learn more about this opportunity. 

 
 

A Coalition for Good - Spreading the Seeds of Sustainability

ISC-Audubon is a coalition of non-profit organizations and initiatives that include The International Sustainability Council (ISC), Audubon Lifestyles, Audubon Outdoors, Planit Green, Broadcast Audubon, and the Audubon Network for Sustainability. 

Funds generated through memberships and donations are used to provide fruit & vegetable seeds, wildflower seed mix, and wildlife feed & birdseed to urban and suburban communities around the world. These seeds are used by communities to establish fruit and vegetable gardens, bird and wildlife sanctuaries, and for the beautification of urban and suburban landscapes by creating flower and native plant gardens.

Read more

You are here: Home Broadcast Audubon Informational Broadcasts State of the Birds 2013