ISC-Audubon

 
 
 

Broadcast Audubon

Ron Dodson, Sustainable Golf Advocate, to Receive ASGCA

Ron Dodson, Audubon Lifestyles Sustainability Advisor, President of Audubon International (AI) and the International Sustainability Council (ISC) and well-regarded advocate for sustainable development in golf, has been chosen to receive the 2009 Donald Ross Award. The award will be presented on May 3, 2009 at the Donald Ross Banquet during the 63nd ASGCA Annual Meeting in Seattle, Wash.

Ron Dodson“With the continued and increasing emphasis on environmental stewardship that surrounds golf development, it was time for ASGCA to again choose a long-time leader in the movement for our highest honor,” notes Bruce Charlton, ASGCA President. “Ron joins Michael Hurdzan, ASGCA, who won the award in 2007, as a reasoned, expert voice in the environmental realm. I’ll be personally honored to present this award to Ron in light of all he’s done to educate the
world about how golf complements a healthy ecosystem.”

One of the most noteworthy projects Dodson oversaw at AI was the creation of the Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Program. Charlton adds, “This certification often functions as a ‘seal of approval’ to help educate the public about how golf that is properly sited, designed and managed can be one of the lowest impact forms of development, and can provide wildlife habitat, protect natural resources and offer community and recreational values.”

Dodson serves on numerous environmentally-focused committees, including The USGA Turf and Environmental Research Committee, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Wildlife Links Research Committee and the Urban Land Institute Sustainable Development Committee. He is a prolific writer on the topic of environmentally-sensitive golf, and is the author of the books “Sustainable Golf” and “Managing Wildlife Habitat on Golf Courses.” He has written numerous articles and reports on the topics of best management practices, facility audits and water quality management at golf facilities. He is also a frequent presenter to state and federal agencies on the topics of hazardous waste assessments and audits, water quality assessment, ecological studies, restoration planning, Environmental Impact Statements and community planning.

The Donald Ross Award was established by the ASGCA Board of Governors in 1976 and is given annually to an individual who has made a positive impact on golf and golf course architecture. Its first recipient was one of ASGCA’s Founding Fathers, Robert Trent Jones. ASGCA’s Donald Ross Award Committee is led by Past President Rees Jones, ASGCA.

ASGCA Background
Founded in 1946 by 14 leading architects, the American Society of Golf Course Architects is a non-profit organization comprised of experienced golf course designers located throughout the United States and Canada. Members have completed a rigorous two-year long application process that includes the peer review of four representative golf courses. ASGCA members are experienced golf course architects, able to counsel in all aspects of golf course design and remodeling.

Sidebar: Donald Ross Award Recipients

 YEAR   RECIPIENT  OCCUPATION
 2009 Ron Dodson  Sustainable Golf Advocate
 2008 George Peper  Golf Writer and Publisher
 2007 Dr. Michael Hurdzan  Golf Course Architect ASGCA
 2006 Jim Awtrey CEO  PGA of America
 2005 John Singleton  Irrigation Pioneer
 2004 Thomas Cousins Philanthropist  Urban Golf Developer
 2003 Bill Campbell  President, USGA, Captain, Royal & Ancient Golf Club
 2002 Byron Nelson  Professional Golfer
 2001 Jack Nicklaus  ASGCA Professional Golfer, Golf Course Architect
 2000 Jaime Ortiz-Patiño  Owner, President, Valderrama Golf Club
 1999 Arnold Palmer  ASGCA Professional Golfer Fellow
 1998 Judy Bell  President, USGA
 1997 Gene Sarazen  Professional Golfer
 1996 Ron Whitten  Golf Writer
 1995 Pete Dye  ASGCA Fellow Golf Course Architect
 1994 James R. Watson  Agronomist
 1993 Brent Wadsworth  Golf Course Builder
 1992 Paul Fullmer  ASGCA Executive Secretary
 1991 Michael Bonallack  Secretary, Royal and Ancient (St. Andrews)
 1990 John Zoller  Former Executive Director, No. California Golf Association
 1989 Dick Taylor  Editor, Golf World Magazine
 1988 Frank Hannigan  USGA Executive Director
 1987 Charles Price  Golf Writer, Author
 1986 Deane Beman  PGA Tour Commissioner
 1985 Peter Dobereiner  London Observer Columnist, Author
 1984 Dinah Shore  Sponsor of Women's Golf Tournaments
 1983 Al Radko Former  Director, USGA Green Section
 1982 Geoffrey Cornish  ASGCA Golf Course Architect, Historian Fellow
 1981 James Rhodes  Governor of Ohio
 1980 Gerald Micklem  Former Captain, Royal and Ancient
 1979 Joe Dey  Former Executive Director of the USGA
 1978 Herb and Joe Graffis  Founders, National Golf Foundation
 1977 Herbert Warren Wind  Golf Digest Columnist, Author
 1976 Robert Trent Jones  ASGCA Founding Member of ASGCA

For More information Contact:

Aileen Smith
125 N. Executive Drive

Brookfield, WI 53005

(262) 786-5960
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

Web site: www.asgca.org

SustainAbility Newsletter Archive Article (random)

Critter of the Season - Big Cypress Fox Squirrel

Fox Squirrel

The Big Cypress Fox Squirrel is a species in decline through much of its former range.  While this critter is dwindling in numbers, it is commonly seen on golf courses, particularly in Southwest, Florida.  Some of the healthiest populations of the squirrel are to be found on the fairways and habitats of the links in Lee and Collier Counties, Florida.

The scientific name of the Big Cypress Fox Squirrel is Sciurus niger avicennia. The genus name Sciurus is from the Greek words skia (shadow) and oura (tail), a reference to the bushy tail which casts a shadow on the squirrel. The Latin species name niger (black) refers to the black color phase which is common in this species.
  
Common name
Fox squirrels may have earned their name from their gray and red fur coat that resemble that of a gray fox, from their comparatively large size and thick bushy tail, and/or from peculiar way of running along the ground which gives the appearance of a small fox.
  
Lifespan
Fox squirrels live from four to seven years of age on average in natural conditions. One individual lived to 18 years of age in captivity.
   
Home range
Ranges vary from 8-32 acres depending on habitat conditions. Fox squirrels have large overlapping home ranges and are non-territorial.
  
Geographic Range
Fox squirrels are found throughout most of Florida except in the Keys. There are three subspecies of fox squirrels in Florida. The Big Cypress Fox Squirrel, Sciurus niger avicennia, is found from the Caloosahatchee River in Lee county south and then east to the southern part of Dade county. Sherman's Fox Squirrel, Sciurus niger shermani is found throughout most of the peninsula. The Carolina Fox Squirrel is found in the panhandle and northwards.
    
Contrary to two common names sometimes given to the Big Cypress Fox Squirrel -- Mangrove Fox Squirrel and Everglades Fox Squirrel -- it is not common in either mangrove or Everglades habitats. It is most common in open pinelands, live oak forests, and stands of bigger bald cypress.
Fox squirrels are found throughout the eastern and central United States, south into northern Mexico, and north into Canada. They have been introduced into urban areas in western North America as well.
  
Status
Big Cypress Fox Squirrel: threatened species
Sherman's Fox Squirrel: species of special concern
   
Habitat
Fox squirrels spend more time on the ground than gray squirrels and are slower moving. They forage for acorns, nuts, fruits, insects, mushrooms, buds and tubers, so they require habitats with an open understory. These include open pine flatwoods, sandhills, mixed pine-hardwood areas and rangeland interspersed with trees. In Florida, the fox squirrel may also be found in cypress stands and occasionally mangrove swamps.
Further north, fox squirrels are found in a diverse array of deciduous and mixed forest. Areas with a good variety of tree species are preferred due to variability in mast production.
   
Physical Characteristics
Fox squirrels weigh from one to three pounds, and exhibit color variations which range from a buff color to gray, and in some instances black. The under parts are usually lighter, and typical specimens have white noses with black faces and feet. They are noted for their long, bushy tails and for their strong hind legs which allows them to leap easily from place to place.
    
Fox squirrels have both a summer and winter coat, and therefore molt twice each year. The spring molt begins in March and may last for weeks, left, whereas the autumn molt begins in September. But the tail only molts once each year during the summer.
   
Fox squirrels have four sets of whiskers located above and below the eyes, on the underside of the head in front of the throat, and on the nose. Whiskers, also known as vibrissae, are touch receptors that provide the animal with information about its immediate surroundings.
   
Fox squirrels have very good eyesight even in dim light, and a wide field of vision. They also have a well developed sense of smell and hearing.
The skull of the fox squirrel has 20 teeth (gray squirrels have 22 teeth). Squirrels have upper and lower incisor teeth followed by a gap called a diastema. The diastema is where the canine teeth would normally be found in carnivorous animals such as cats or dogs, or omnivorous animals such as monkeys. Behind the diastema are the cheek or grinding teeth which consist of premolars and molars.
   
As with other rodent species, the incisors continuously grow to compensate for the enormous amount of wear that comes from a herbivorous diet.
Young squirrels have milk teeth which are replaced by permanent teeth when they are between six and twelve months old.
  
Fox squirrels are highly adapted for climbing trees and fatal falls are rare. Adaptations for climbing include sharp recurved claws, well developed extensors of digits and flexors of forearms, and abdominal musculature.
 
Tails are used for balance when running and leaping between trees, and held over the back of a resting animal.
    


PDF

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE ENTIRE NEWSLETTER IN PDF FORMAT
References and Sources used in this issue of SustainAbility Newsletter Include:
Audubon Lifestyles
www.audubonlifestyles.org 
  
The International Sustainability Council
www.thesustainabilitycouncil.org 

Toyota
www.toyota.com

Ford Motors
www.ford.com

Girl Scouts of America
www.girlscouts.org

Austin Ranch
www.austinranch.com

Turf Feeding Systems
www.turffeeding.com

The University of Michigan
www.umich.edu

The Dodson Group
www.thedodsongrp.com      

To learn about sponsorship opportunities please call us at: 727-733-0762
This Issue of the SustainAbility Newsletter sponsored in part by:

The Dodson Group

$25 Annually $100 Annually $250 Reg / $100 Annually


SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITY

Sponsors are a critically important part to the success of ISC-Audubon. As a non-profit organization dedicated to advocating sustainability, we offer all of our programs to our members free of charge, and are publicly available for download on our website.

ISC-Audubon is proud to extend the opportunity to select businesses and organizations to become sponsors of our sustainability education and advocacy programs. As a sponsor, your business or organization can realize significant value.

Click here to learn more about this opportunity. 

 
 

A Coalition for Good - Spreading the Seeds of Sustainability

ISC-Audubon is a coalition of non-profit organizations and initiatives that include The International Sustainability Council (ISC), Audubon Lifestyles, Audubon Outdoors, Planit Green, Broadcast Audubon, and the Audubon Network for Sustainability. 

Funds generated through memberships and donations are used to provide fruit & vegetable seeds, wildflower seed mix, and wildlife feed & birdseed to urban and suburban communities around the world. These seeds are used by communities to establish fruit and vegetable gardens, bird and wildlife sanctuaries, and for the beautification of urban and suburban landscapes by creating flower and native plant gardens.

Read more

You are here: Home Broadcast Audubon Informational Broadcasts Ron Dodson, Sustainable Golf Advocate, to Receive ASGCA