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SustainAbility Newsletter

Green Cities Conference

Green Cities 2009Green Cities™ Florida is the inaugural launch of the Green Cities™ event series. This event held May 19-21, 2009 at the Orange County Convention Center North Concourse Building will create significant opportunities specific to creating a green economy in the state of Florida. This is not your usual conference; Green Cities™ offers interactive and collaborative workshops, nationally known experts in sustainability, best practices case studies, conversation café environments, meet the consultants’ roundtable, green jobs seminar, and open space technology sessions. This event is designed to provide you: short and long-term steps towards sustainable practices, opportunities to network with like-minded peers, green tools and resources, and demonstration on how the “triple bottom line” does provide for people, planet, and profit. The outcome for attendees will be direct paths to joining the wave of business and government who are leading the green economy. Green Cities™ Florida Showcase is an interactive and educational demonstration of sustainable solutions. The showcase area will also feature:

  • Premier sponsors' sustainable products and services
  • Green Bookstore
  • Fair Trade and organic beverage break networking
  • Organic meal buffets
  • Cool Green lounge area  

Learn more at: www.greencities.com


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References and Sources used in this issue of SustainAbility Newsletter Include:

Audubon Lifestyles
www.audubonlifestyles.com

The International Sustainability Council
www.thesustainabilitycouncil.org

MSNBC
www.msnbc.com

Green Cities
www.greencities.com

The Daily Green
www.thedailygreen.com

LandDesign
www.landdesign.com

Sustainability Campaign
sustainabilitycampaign.blogspot.com

Energy Star
www.energystar.gov

Green Hotels List
www.independenttraveler.com

 

SustainAbility Newsletter Archive Article (random)

Fertilizer Buying Guide

FertilizerA sustainable lawn or garden starts with healthy soil. Natural fertilizers promote the growth of beneficial bacteria, earthworms and fungi that build soil structure and foster healthy plants.

The best fertilizer for your lawn and garden is homemade compost, made from food scraps, lawn clippings and fall leaves. If you still need store-bought products, here are a few tips.

Compost: Commercially made compost has high levels of naturally occurring phosphorous and nitrogen that is released gradually and is absorbed more easily by plants. Other soil improvers, such as worm castings, Epsom salts and decomposed organic matter called humates, add nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. Watch out for commercial fertilizers, even those labeled "organic," that contain harmful ingredients, such as animal byproducts or sewage sludge. Animal byproducts, such as bone meal or fish meal, may have come from industrial farming operations, and sewage sludge, could be contaminated with diseases or heavy metals.

"NOFA Approved" and "OMRI Listed": The Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI) and the Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA), an accredited certifying agency for the USDA National Organic Program, approve products that have been composted according to USDA Organic standards. The only synthetic materials that can be added to NOFA approved compost are those allowed in organic crop production.

An organic lawn or garden starts with healthy soil. Natural fertilizers promote the growth of beneficial bacteria, earthworms and fungi that build soil structure and foster healthy plants.

  1. Have your soil tested by your local USDA Cooperative Extension Service to determine pH and what nutrients, if any, your grass is missing, or test it yourself with a soil testing kit.
  2. Once you know the pH, you can add organic matter to help balance it. Lawns prefer slightly acidic soils with a pH range of 6.5 to 7, but flowers, shrubs and trees vary in their pH preferences. Lime helps balance acidic soil, while sulfur helps with alkaline.
  3. To find out the nutrient content of a fertilizer, look for the "NPK" number (NPK stands for nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium). A "5-6-5" NPK number, for instance, means that a fertilizer is 5 percent nitrogen, 6 percent phosphorus and 5 percent potassium with the remaining 84 percent representing filler material.

 - excerpted from NG's GreenGuide for Everyday Living


PDF

 
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE ENTIRE NEWSLETTER IN PDF FORMAT

References and Sources used in this issue of SustainAbility Newsletter Include:

Audubon Lifestyles
www.audubonlifestyles.com

The International Sustainability Council
www.thesustainabilitycouncil.org  

The Reserve at Lake Keowee
www.thereserveatlakekeowee.com

The Old Collier Club
www.theoldcolliergc.com

The Rim Golf Club
www.therimgolfclub.com

Golfpreserves
www.golfcourseproject.com

Coke
www.coke.com

 

Energy Star
www.energystar.gov 

The Village of Blume
www.taylorpropertiesgroup.edu 

Taylor Properties Group
www.taylorpropertiesgrp.com  

Nike
www.nike.com

National Geographic
www.nationalgeographic.com 

American Society of Golf Course Architects
www.asgca.org

The United States Golf Association (USGA)
www.usga.org

    

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SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITY

Sponsors are a critically important part to the success of ISC-Audubon. As a non-profit organization dedicated to advocating sustainability, we offer all of our programs to our members free of charge, and are publicly available for download on our website.

ISC-Audubon is proud to extend the opportunity to select businesses and organizations to become sponsors of our sustainability education and advocacy programs. As a sponsor, your business or organization can realize significant value.

Click here to learn more about this opportunity. 

 
 

A Coalition for Good - Spreading the Seeds of Sustainability

ISC-Audubon is a coalition of non-profit organizations and initiatives that include The International Sustainability Council (ISC), Audubon Lifestyles, Audubon Outdoors, Planit Green, Broadcast Audubon, and the Audubon Network for Sustainability. 

Funds generated through memberships and donations are used to provide fruit & vegetable seeds, wildflower seed mix, and wildlife feed & birdseed to urban and suburban communities around the world. These seeds are used by communities to establish fruit and vegetable gardens, bird and wildlife sanctuaries, and for the beautification of urban and suburban landscapes by creating flower and native plant gardens.

Read more